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    $24.95 list($5.95)
    1. Bookmarks
    $49.00 list()
    2. Stanford Social Innovation Review
    $32.00 list()
    3. Foreign Affairs
    $19.95 list()
    4. Poets & Writers Magazine
    $65.00 list()
    5. New York Times Book Review
    $66.36 list($64.00)
    6. New York Review Of Books
    $54.67 list($39.95)
    7. Magnificat
    $19.97 list()
    8. Good Old Days
    $17.98 list()
    9. Reminisce Magazine
    $16.97 list($23.40)
    10. Guideposts - Large Print Ed
    $29.95 list()
    11. Penthouse Letters
    $29.95 list()
    12. True West
    $20.14 list($17.99)
    13. Yoga International
    $1.00
    14. PETA Animal Times
    $37.80 list($35.00)
    15. Current History
    $39.95 list()
    16. Piensa En Espanol = Think Spanish
    $19.95 list()
    17. What Is Enlightenment
    $58.48 list($56.00)
    18. Realtor Magazine
    $31.37 list($30.00)
    19. Parabola
    $37.80 list($35.00)
    20. Poetry

    1. Bookmarks
    list price: $5.95
    our price: $24.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0000AJLX9
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Phillips & Nelson Media Inc
    Sales Rank: 99
    Average Customer Review: 4.73 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Reviews (11)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Indispensible resource for readers of all genres and ages
    (****1/2) Bookmarks (A Reader's Guide to the Best in Books) is the newest magazine for bibliophiles in the market. Since its preview/debut issue in Summer 2002, Bookmarks has released 10 issues featuring a mixed bag of classics and contemporary authors like Steinbeck, Dickens, Garcia Marquez, Virginia Woolf, Waugh, Austen, Morrison, Naipaul, Potok, Faulkner, Potok, Vonnegut, and Philip Roth.

    The bi-monthly publication has book reviews and selections for readers of all ages. The "Book by Book" section will features a detailed coverage on works of a specific author, suggestions on introductory books to the author, a specific genre of literature, or a particular time period. The currents issue (May/June 2004) features Leo Tolstoy and Literary Voices of the Pre-Civil Rights Era, with a look at classic works by Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, and James Baldwin.

    More than half the pages of the magazine focus on navigating the ever-expanding sea of reading: new books, now-in-paperback books, and reader-favorite recommendations. This is by far the most useful and timesaving resource for me to search for my next reading selection. The "Selections" allows me to preview staff favorites from among the most highly rated books in an issue (usually 4 stars and above).

    The "New Book Guide" features book reviews separated into genres like spot, literary fiction, crime, sci-fi, general non-fiction, biography, history, science, and arts. It is therefore structured to find easily the information about a particular book most appealing and relevant to me. Each book featured in this section has a critical summary. The books covered fall into three basic categories: highly rated books that received many reviews, highly rated books that received less comprehensive coverage, and lower rated books that were widely reviewed and well-publicized. That way general popularity of the books, as well as the collective but disparaging critics may be accommodated. Highly rated books maybe balanced with the less publicized or lower-rated books. After all, it is frustrating to apply ratings to any works of literary arts in the absence of myriad choices. To accommodate such need, supplemental reading is provided.

    Bookmarks strives to accommodate palates readers of all ages and genres. In any given issue readers will find, in addition to the new releases and talk-of-the-town books that perch on bestseller list, works of classics. I find the inclusion on works of classics and their authors very appealing to me. Bookmarks has simply topped my favorite periodical list for the year and become my reading companion.

    2004 (28) © MY

    5-0 out of 5 stars Unbelievable...
    This magazine is an unbelievable, exhaustive compilation of reviews covering the universe of recently published books. Overall, the writing in the magazine is as dazzling as its layout, managing to be both concise and intellectually enlightening at the same time. Reviews from around the world are compiled and distilled to their very essence, allowing the reader to emerge with a reasonable understanding of the next book with which to curl up. As if that were not enough, each issue features at least two, well-crafted original retrospectives focusing on a particular chosen author's body of work and the historical context from which each book was created.

    This is truly a magazine written by and for people who are crazy about books. It is beautiful both in its appearance and in its writing. There is no greater compliment to the magazine than in my giving a gift subscription to my favorite (long-time-ago) high school English teacher. I hope he will enjoy it as much as I have!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fantasmagorical
    As an avid reader, I find this magazine an invaluable addition to my library. It gives concise, well-written reviews of both current and classic literature. I have chosen many new titles based on the reviews in BOOKMARKS, and have not once been disappointed. I often give this magazine as gift for graduations, birthdays, holidays. Every month they do an overview of an author: life, works, influences, and an analysis of the literature written. These articles are always an excellent read. This is a great beach/pool/summertime magazine. Also - a great resource for book clubs. I recommend it highly.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Recommendation
    Planned well,interesting reading material,gives information about new books.Wish you all the best.

    5-0 out of 5 stars For book lovers
    You know that expression "so many books, so little time"? After reading a few issues of "Bookmarks" you will be exposed to so many wonderful books and authors that you will be chanting this as a mantra. It is obvious from the first page of this bimonthly magazine that the editors love books as much as their readers do. It provides balanced coverage of books by bringing together reviews from many other publications, giving you the opportunity to see comments from glowing to scathing so that you can decide for yourself whether a book is worth reading. There are many innovative regular features: "What One Book" takes a topic such as yoga or jazz and asks the experts to suggest books about it; "If..." poses a hypothetical situation and then provides reading suggestions; "Have you read?" provides recommendations by readers. Every issue highlights a veteran author and provides an overview on their writing career and a bibliography. If you only want to subscribe to one magazine for bibliophiles, this should be it! ... Read more


    2. Stanford Social Innovation Review

    our price: $49.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0000D8CYJ
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Stanford Grad School Business
    Sales Rank: 4407
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    Abstract


    Presents the best ideas in nonprofit management, philanthropy & corporate citizenship.
    ... Read more


    3. Foreign Affairs

    our price: $32.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00007LN7R
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Council On Foreign Relations
    Sales Rank: 143
    Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Abstract


    Reviews current events as they affect US relations worldwide, focusing on international, political, commercial and cultural relations.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (10)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A worthy read
    I've read this journal routinely since picking it up for the first time last summer. The articles typically contain rather substantial information without devolving into esoteric or pedantic treatises, and their subjects run the gamut in international affairs. Topics I've read have included analyses of American foreign policy toward different nations, recountings of human rights abuses, and editorial-type articles "grading" the action of American politicians. I also discovered that it's on the recommended reading list for those wanting to take the Foreign Service exam, which is a pretty high recommendation in itself.

    In all, I'd call it a well-rounded, worthy read for anyone wanting more information about world affairs than you get in the typical American newspaper or news journal.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Relevant, Interesting
    I have to admit that when I subscribed to this magazine for the first time about five years ago, I did so out of a sense of duty to educate myself about all of the foreign policy and political things that I wasn't taught in school. It did seem a little dry from the get-go, but now I am a Foreign Affairs junkie, so to speak. Those who contribute articles to this magazine are professors, politicians, heads of state, and other great (and occasionally not-so-great) thinkers of our times. One gets the perspectives of world events from educated individuals from all over the world, not just America, and sometimes the points of view are very different than those of the American media. I also appreciate that Foreign Affairs publishes articles that almost seem to foreshadow news events - (they were covering background on Kosovo before newscasters in this country even knew where Kosovo was.) From reading this magazine one can see that very few problems in the world are "overnight" or occur "out of nowhere" but are usually the result of problems and conflicts that have been happening for some time, if only out of the spotlight of the Western mainstream media. The analysis in these articles is deep - many articles are over twenty pages long. The reader is left feeling more enlightened and not as if the issue has just been "glossed over." I enjoy reading the Letters to the Editor as well. It is great to see an article rebutted by another area expert who provides his or her insight to the problem at hand. Also,the list of contributors to Letters to the Editor reads like a list of Who's Who in Politics. It is amazing to see the people in government, here and abroad, who read this magazine. Probably more of them should.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Authorative Source of Foreign Affairs Information
    Foreign Affairs magazine is one of the most authorative, primary source of information regarding geopolitical and economic affairs. Although principally a medium for elites to express their opinion regarding what is happening around the world, this material can allow anyone in the world, even in remote regions, to feel quite connected with those in power.

    Written in clear, concise English, it is surprisingly readable considering the subject matter. Don't expect any pictures, however: there are none. However, if you want information on Iraq, North Korean, Iran, and the UN, this is your source of material. Some of the subject matter, of course, is biased: sometimes Clinton croonies contribute material, which I quickly ignore by averting my eyes. But the magazine is not meant to be a source of objective material: there is no reporting, the way you find in The Economist; all of it is first-person essays.

    Michael Gordon

    5-0 out of 5 stars It is simply the best!
    This magazine is simply the very best there is - and I too have been reading it faithfully for many years now. It is THE magazine for anyone who wants to be any kind of globally aware citizen in these troubled times - and it is always easy to understand and written in plain English as well (which certainly does help....) I will be a happy reader I trust for many more years to come. Christopher Catherwood, author of CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS AND ISLAMIC RAGE (Zondervan, 2003)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Long Time Subscriber
    I have been reading Foreign Affairs for more than 30 years. It is an integral part of a broad-based understanding of international issues, both current and historical. It can also be very prescient at times. (See Clash of Civilizations, 1993)

    The articles are not to be rushed through. Read them slowly and savor them, whether you agree with them or not. Give it a try! ... Read more


    4. Poets & Writers Magazine

    our price: $19.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006KT0K
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Poets & Writers Inc
    Sales Rank: 640
    Average Customer Review: 4.25 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (4)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Practical, Educational, Nicely Presented
    There are a few magazines about writing serious writers need to read. "Poets & Writers" is one of them. It has a literary bent, but avoids the nose-in-the-air attitude. It is practical and educational, and is pleasingly presented.

    A favorite factor for me are the long feature articles on the culture of writing. In the issue out now, there are two major articles. One is about author Stuart Dybek and his fiction that pulls from his experience growing up on Chicago's colorful South Side. The other is about writing contests, dealing with how ethical they are run, the view of literary judges, and when a writer should considering entering one.

    The secondary articles are as informative and as useful, whether you want to learn about promoting your book, doing online workshops or understand the trends driving the industry.

    Contests, incidentally, are a big part of PW's value. The magazine tells you who won, and which contests/grants are currently accepting submissions. PW is careful to screen which contests are listed, ensuring only legitimate ones make it through the editors.

    The writing itself is interesting. It is not always true that writing magazines are fun to read. It should be, and in the case of PW, everything is engaging.

    PW's design is clean. It looks like what a small press literary magazine should look like. The typography and layout are not pretentious or overbearing, but get the job done. It is never work to read this magazine.

    I fully recommend "Poets & Writers." You will be better informed about writing and writers, just like the titles implies.

    Anthony Trendl

    2-0 out of 5 stars Poets and Writers
    I have been a writer for many years. This is one of the worst publications for the field there is. Not useful at all. Waste of time and money

    5-0 out of 5 stars By far the best writer's resource magazine
    This magazine is a must have for professional poets.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Every writer should subscribe
    Poets & Writers is a non-profit organization dedicated to issues of interest to both amateur and professional writers; this is the organization's magazine. Every issue features an in-depth interview with a writer, articles on subjects such as copyright law, writer's conferences, and book promotion, a list of grant/award/contest deadlines and winners, and the ever popular classifieds where writers can find listings for anthologies and calls for manuscripts. Even the ads scattered throughout are informative. Your subscription cost gives you membership in the organization, allowing you access to their services. Published writers are eligible to be listed in their directory.

    If you are a fiction writer or poet, you will appreciate this magazine. Poets & Writers is an invaluable tool for beginners and established writers alike. ... Read more


    5. New York Times Book Review

    our price: $65.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006KPXQ
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: New York Times
    Sales Rank: 360
    Average Customer Review: 2 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    Sold each week both separately and as part of the Sunday New York Times, the Book Review divides the published world into two parts for easy consumption: nonfiction, and fiction and poetry. There is no attempt to be comprehensive. Although scholarly books are regularly reviewed, the sort of thing chosen is likely to be no more arcane than a cultural history of Halloween or a new biography of Jesse James, along with, say, the memoirs of David Rockefeller. The reader of the Book Review can also expect to find the latest novel by Joyce Carol Oates or Pat Conroy as well as the efforts of one or two first novelists and the new book of poems by Billy Collins. What distinguishes the reviews from those of your hometown Sunday newspaper are principally three things: there are more of them (each issue runs some 20 pages), they are likely to be more searching and more critical (often the reviewers are at least as well-known as the authors reviewed), and each review has behind it the authority of the New York Times itself, whose cultural as well as political clout is simply unmatched in American life. For a book to sell, it doesn’t necessarily have to be considered in the Book Review. For a book to be taken seriously,it probably does--and readers who take themselves seriously invariably read the Book Review. --Terry Caesar ... Read more

    Reviews (2)

    2-0 out of 5 stars Painfully political
    Wish NYT would get back in the business of intellectual inquiry

    2-0 out of 5 stars New York Times needs more Objectivism.
    Some newspapers use the word "Nazi" to cover-up for the monstrous National Socialist German Workers' Party, in a vain effort to rehabilitate socialism. The New York Times website search engine reveals that the newspaper has NEVER fully identified the horrid "National Socialist German Workers' Party" since apparently at least 1996. In comparison the newspaper used the hackneyed abbreviations "Nazi" & "Nazis" & "Nazism" thousands of times, apparently exclusively of their full meaning. Try the search engine at newspapers in your area. The NYT search engine shows no instance in which the Times has ever informed their reading public of the full phrase for the monstrous party. An objective newspaper would use the full phrase more often to help explain and educate the public about the newspaper's hackneyed lazy use of the horrid term "Nazi." Does the newspaper have a de facto policy to use "Nazi" to cover-up the monstrous "National Socialist German Workers' Party" as an effort to rehabilitate socialism?

    The NYT was very slow to acknowledge the lack of objectivity of it's former writer Walter Duranty's cover-ups for the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. That same bias means that the paper will rarely if ever tell its readers about the "Wholecaust" whereby the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics slaughtered 62 million people; and the Peoples' Republic of China slaughtered 35 million; and the National Socialist German Workers' Party, 21 million.

    The parent newspaper is very socialistic and rarely prints anything about libertarian writers, and if so, unfavorably. The New York Times serves as an example to other newspapers to turn away from sick socialism (whether national socialism or any other kind), and to turn toward personal and economic freedom.

    Like so many newspapers the NYT makes liberty-lovers say "Thank goodness for the internet!" ... Read more


    6. New York Review Of Books
    list price: $64.00
    our price: $66.36
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00007G2SO
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: New York Review Of Books
    Sales Rank: 573
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    If all book reviews aspire to the condition of magazines, the New York Review would represent the best realization of this aspiration to date. It retains the character of a book review, published 20 times a year. But since its inception over 30 years ago, the reviews have been long, dense (recent years have brought the practice of footnotes), and learned. Significant fiction is pondered, along with bits of poetry, slices of science, and gobs of political science, history, economics, biography, art, and music. The reader of the New York Review easily feels relieved of the cultural burden of having to read a book once having completed the sufficient burden of having read a thorough review of it. Although the impeccably left-leaning editors would be loathe to agree, only major figures or discourses in the European intellectual tradition need apply to their pages for consideration. Hence, for example, although occasional "pieces" on certain worthy movies now appear, popular culture is not a serious concern. Lately, the Review has given over more of its pages (from 60 to 80 each issue) to journalistic reports--the latest political currents in China or Russia, the state of affairs in Kurdistan or at Camp X-Ray in Guantanamo Bay. Its core identity remains, however, that of a magazine unequaled for addressing intellectual "issues"--Darwin under attack again, pedophilia continuing in the Church, whither globalization--through reviewing them as these issues appear in book form. --Terry Caesar ... Read more

    Reviews (2)

    5-0 out of 5 stars This is one of my favorites
    Sometimes I read all the reviews in the NYRB, even reviews of things I'd probably never buy, or art exhibitions I wouldn't go to. They are so well written that I learn a lot. I have some favorite writers who show up there a lot, such as Garry Wills.

    In magazines like Time the reviews are so consumer-oriented that you really wouldn't bother with them unless you were actually considering buying the book or recording that they're talking about. But in the NYRB, they really talk about interesting stuff. There are also a lot of essays that aren't reviews, exactly, but just reflect on the state of the world. The New Yorker used to have long essays like that, but since Tina Brown started running it, they don't do that any more. (Basically, with the New Yorker you used to get free "books", because some of those essays were as long as short books. Now you don't. There are still longish essays like that in the NYRB, sometimes published in parts.)

    There is also something aesthetically pleasing about the size and layout of the magazine. It's tabloid-sized on newsprint (but not newsprint that yellows with time) and is very readable. No glossy trash.

    I checked my last issue and the new-subscriber price listed there is $64/year. So Amazon's price is OK. If you get an issue on the newsstand for $4.50 and then subscribe, you'll pay $68.50.

    5-0 out of 5 stars If You Only Read One Periodical This is It
    A playground for the mind. Covers a wide range of subjects. Each review is a full essay on the subject of the book. Many reviews compare and contrast several recently published books on the same subject. Learned and sophisticated yet fully accessible. An on-going liberal arts education and the easiest way I know to keep the eclectic learning that a liberal arts education aspires to. ... Read more


    7. Magnificat
    list price: $39.95
    our price: $54.67
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006LCVV
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Magnificat
    Sales Rank: 905
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (2)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Information and Inspiration
    Magnificat is the best daily Missal I've seen, and it's really catching on in our parish. Besides morning and evening prayers and readings, and complete Mass details, each day includes a powerful meditation written by a different spiritual writer--the diversity of these authors is amazing. There are also mini-biographies of Saints sprinkled throughout, including many who may not be familiar. Each month's edition starts out with an essay devoted to a seasonal issue of apologetics, theology, spirituality, or liturgy. The booklets are just small enough to fit in a pocket or purse, and the subscription includes a special edition for Holy Week with full details of all Masses and much more. All in all a great value.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The BEST daily missal for Catholics with art & articles
    Magnificat includes daily Scripture readings, morning & evening prayers, reflections on daily and Sunday Mass readings, a longer article at the end with Old Masters artwork, plus a section including the variety of prayers used at every Mass so you can bring it with you to follow along. A beautiful publication I look forward to every month. ... Read more


    8. Good Old Days

    our price: $19.97
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006KFT2
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: House Of White Birches
    Sales Rank: 455
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    9. Reminisce Magazine

    our price: $17.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006KUXE
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Reiman Publications
    Sales Rank: 321
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    10. Guideposts - Large Print Ed
    list price: $23.40
    our price: $16.97
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006KG80
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Guideposts/mail Receiving
    Sales Rank: 475
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    11. Penthouse Letters

    our price: $29.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0001EK96A
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: General Media Publishing Co
    Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Reviews (1)

    4-0 out of 5 stars mostly lies,but good stories
    Penthouse has always been better than playboy when it comes to erotic pictures and stories. This magazine is always full of entertaining stories and letters from readers that are supposed to be fact based exploits,maybe 50/50 in reality. The pictures are very explicit and erotic. Great entertainment for adults only. ... Read more


    12. True West

    our price: $29.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006L08E
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: True West Publishing
    Sales Rank: 493
    Average Customer Review: 3.75 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (4)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Paid for subscription, Never received 1 copy ?
    To whom it may cocern, 3/15/04
    I sent in a check #4816 for $29.95 and received check back Stamped with `For Deposit Only' DATED 9/2/03
    TRUE WEST PUBLISHING
    004671587660

    With : Pay To The Order Of
    BANK OF AMERICA
    122101706
    On the top of the BACK OF THE CHECK FOR the SUBSCRITION. But have not received a SINGLE ISSUE as of TODAY!?
    About this time frame I became very sick and after months
    they told me that I had Severe case of CHEMICAL SOLVENT POISON-
    ING & have to sell my HOUSE to move North somewhere. What I want is for someone too Please look into this MATTER & Help Me get it Straightened out so I will receive what I have PAID FOR. THANK YOU VERY MUCH,can get me @ rmmccahon @ prodigy.net or Robert McCahon-(361)985-9535. P.O.Box 271427, Corpus Christi, TX. 78427
    Robert McCahon
    CC/RMMCCAHON@PRODIGY.NET
    BGS

    5-0 out of 5 stars True West Breathes New Life into the Old West
    I just finished reading both the January and February/March 2003 issues of True West magazine. What a treat! This periodical covers the American West in a style which is simultaneously engaging and enlightening. If you are a history buff, lover of western lore or just want a satisfying read, pick up this magazine.

    True West is celebrating 50 years of publication (no small feat) by dedicating a large portion of each issue this year to a "50 Most" list relevant to the old West. Additionally, the January issue has a timeline beginning in 1800 which covers a
    20-year span charting the exploration and settlement of the West. The February/March issue picks up this thread and subsequent issues will carry it right up to 1953, the year of the magazine's inception.

    The January issue gives an impressive look at the "The 50 Most Important Historical Photos of the Old West". There are several absorbing articles relating to one of the most important events in America's history: Lewis and Clark's exploratory trek west with the Corps of Discovery. And much more.

    The February/March issue focuses on "The 50 Guns That Won the West". A big serving of other good articles cover topics including the Alamo and the fur-trapping adventures of the legendary "Mountain Men".

    Well over a dozen regular departments -- "Classic Gunfights", "How the West Is Worn" and "Collecting the West" are a few -- along with cleverly executed illustrations and interesting sidebars fill out the rest of the magazine's glossy, high-color pages.

    It is getting much harder these days to find a publication worth reading from cover to cover. I recommend you get a subscription to True West. You won't be disappointed.

    4-0 out of 5 stars FUN THINGS TO READ AND BUY!
    My husband has been getting this magazine for about a year. I picked up an issue a few months ago and was quite surprised! I really enjoyed the article in the January issue on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. There are so many fun things to read and buy! I might have to get my own subscription!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great surprise
    Just finished my second issue and what a terrific magazine. If anyone has any interest whatsoever in anything 'Western', this has got to be a must read. Some great photography and art. Even the ads are fun. ... Read more


    13. Yoga International
    list price: $17.99
    our price: $20.14
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006LE8A
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Himalayan International Inst
    Sales Rank: 765
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best Yoga Magazine I've seen!!!
    I think that Yoga International is, hands down, the best magazine on this topic. It has interesting, well written articles on all aspects of yoga (philosophy,life style, meditation, sanskrit chants, etc.) and beautiful photographs. I read it cover to cover as soon as it comes. In addition, the magazine is supplemented by its website where I've been able to actually hear the pronounciation of sanskrit chants.

    To give you a flavor of the magazine, a recent issue (May 2003) included the following articles: Awakening to the Gayatri Mantra; Postures to Activate the Lymph System for Breast Care; Awakening Spirit, A Joyful Practice: Cultivating the Moment; Really Relaxing, The Yoga Sutra: Four Pillars of Concentration, Descendants of Gods (by Huston Smith), and Everyday Ayurveda. In addition, there was a wonderful editorial offering a alternate perspective on viewing the world in these times when many people are viewing everything through a lens of fear. ... Read more


    14. PETA Animal Times
    list price: $1.00
    our price: $1.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0001FAX2E
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: PETA
    Sales Rank: 660
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (10)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great magazine for animal lovers!
    I have read more than one issue of this magazine. It is quite informative and has great articles for animal lovers, as well as resources for finding animal-friendly products and recipes. I would encourage anyone that loves animals to read this magazine to learn about issues that affect us all, especially our animal friends. I would further recommend that you share copies with others so that they, too, can learn about animal issues. We must all work together to improve the lives of animals everywhere and be informed about the many shameful abuses they face from humans every day.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great magazine, Great information
    This magazine is great for anyone wishing to keep up to date on what is happening in the animal rights field. This magazine showcases what PETA and other organizations are doing to help animals in the United States and throughout the entire world. This magazine is also a good source of vegetarian and vegan recipes, and helpful tips for new vegetarians.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Simply the Best
    Animal Times is the best! It has opened my mind to so many issues and concepts. It also includes great recipes and wonderful recurring columns, like "A Doctor in the House." If you have ever wondered about becoming a vegetarian or vegan, or about supporting the circus or rodeo, you have got to subscribe! In up-beat, reader-friendly articles, Animal Times spreads the message of compassion. Nobody does it better.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Must read for anyone who loves animals
    This is a great magazine that I have been subscribing to for years. So informative on a wide variety of animal issues from their treatment in laboratories to how they are treated in factory farms. Their investigative reporting really gets to the truth of the matter. Everyone should be reading this magazine. What you do not know will hutr you and innocent animals.

    5-0 out of 5 stars My frav magazine!!
    This magazine is by far the best I get. I love hearing about recent celbrities and what they do for the animals/ I love learning more about what is going on and what companys are practicing cruelty and what ones are not. Keep it up PETA and thanks for the word of mouth. ... Read more


    15. Current History
    list price: $35.00
    our price: $37.80
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    Asin: B00006LBR4
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Current History Inc
    Sales Rank: 1297
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (2)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Anatol Lieven review
    Lieven's article, "In the Mirror of Europe: The Perils of American Nationalism";is succinct, cogent, and in my opinion frighteningly accurate. My experience as a professor convinces me that we are in the midst of a nationalistic arrogance, whipped by endlessly reptetiive mantras including 9/11, war on terrorism and god, which the majority of my students now accept as truth. I have one suggestion, I think Mr. Lieven is overly optimistic when he comments that the neoconservative empire-builders are not yet the majority in positions of power. I feel their reach inlcudes the legislative and executive branch, much of the leadership of coporate America, an increasing number of Jewish and Christian denominations, much of the media-particularly AM talk radio, higher education, the military, and with another four years of the current administration, federal courts at all levels. I will bring up this article in many of my discussion groups. I think the article was well-written and important, my congratulations to the author.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Monthly News Magazine!
    This magazine must be one of the best kept secrets, because it's been out for ninety years and I'm the first to write a review! In my effort to become more knowledgeable about the world, I've been trying out lots of magazines. Perhaps it is a sign of my slow maturation that I am now reading magazines that do not have pictures, such as Foreign Affairs and now, Current History. Current History is a monthly that is published nine months a year, September through May. Each issue contains about eight articles which are well-written, engaging, informative, and insightful; the articles are thoughtful and I can't detect any bias or agenda. In the back of each issue there is a monthly world review and a map highlighting current events. Some people might be misled by the magazine's title, thinking it covers past history rather than current events. But it is actually covering the events happening today that are making history - the difference between historic and historical. Try one issue - if you can find it in your local magazine store - and you will be hooked! ... Read more


    16. Piensa En Espanol = Think Spanish

    our price: $39.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00009VPF2
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Second Language Publishing
    Sales Rank: 434
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (4)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good for learning
    Increasingly you need to have two or more languages. If your kids are learning spanish, this is helpful.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Very Good for those who've studied some Spanish
    If you would like to keep your reading and listening skills up but live in a situation where you do not have frequent chances to do so in real life, this Magazine should be very helpful for you. It covers a wide range of subject materials of all Latin countries, including Spain; the vocabulary improvement with these articles is significant. One word of Caution: I do not think that this magazine is for a brand-new person to Spanish. At least one year of formal Spanish in high school or college would be advisable. I had two years of high school Spanish and two years of University level Spanish and lived the first 30 years of my life in Texas; and yet, I still find this magazine challenging while at the same time very helpful. It also makes a great and unique gift. BE SURE TO BUY THE AUDIO CD ALONG WITH THE PRINTED MAGAZINE; that is more expensive but well worth it!
    ¡Beuna Suerte!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Get the CD edition!
    I've been subscribing to this magazine for more than a year. It's really helped me with my reading. The issues are small and the articles are short. An article is usually from one to three pages in large type with glossaries in the margins.

    Even though the articles are short, I will often concentrate on one article at a time, rereading it several times a day for a couple of days. When I can read the article straight through without consulting the glossary, and understand everything, I move on to the next.

    Around April of last year (2004), the magazine began offering an optional audio CD. The CD contains each of the magazine articles read aloud. I think this is the best feature of the magazine. Now it helps me as much with my listening as it does with my reading.

    Since I started getting the CD, I now listen to the article that I'm concentrating on over & over until I think I understand most of it. Only then will I read the article. I will read it until I understand it completely. Then I listen to it some more, until I'm comfortable with it.

    The articles cover all sorts of topics from all around the Spanish speaking world: Geography, People, Environment, History, Culture. And there are regular features: recipes, crosswords, lessons.

    If you're serious about learing Spanish and you're at a beginner-intermediate level (or maybe higher) you should try this magazine. The website (http://www.readspanish.com) has sample pages and audio online. I'm not sure if they sell samples or back issues, but they have a product called "Audio Guide to Places in Spain" that's fairly cheap. It's in a smaller format than the magazine, but it might help you decide if this sort of thing is right for you.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A great magazine for learning to read Spanish
    I've been trying, in a leisurely and sporadic sort of way, to learn Spanish, and I was looking for a magazine for Spanish-speaking children, figuring that would be suitable for my current reading level, but then I ran across this magazine, which is just what I needed. If you have at least a little bit of background in Spanish--the basic grammar and vocabulary you'd learn in a year or two of high school Spanish--this magazine is a great tool for expanding your vocabulary and practicing reading.

    The magazine contains articles in Spanish, written by native Spanish speakers, about life in Spanish-speaking countries--history, culture, daily life, biographies, news, even recipes. Each article has a glossary next to it that translates well over half of the words and phrases in the article. You're expected to understand only really basic vocabulary and obvious cognates. For example, in the issue I'm looking at, these are some of the words that aren't translated: con, para, mi, esto, hay, cinco, nuevo, son, muchos, octubre, ahora, familia, radicalmente, internacional. And these are translated in the glossaries: aquellas, viven, respuestas, alrededor, mientras, quedaban, esperar, encuentro, desarollo, ayudar.

    The magazine also includes Spanish crossword puzzles and brief lessons (in English) on Spanish grammar and usage. Each issue is relatively short--about 18 pages--but that's been more than enough for me each month.

    (Incidentally, a great book for learning to read Spanish--just to read it, not to write or speak it--is "Spanish for Reading" by Franco and Sandberg, which is suitable even for complete beginners.) ... Read more


    17. What Is Enlightenment

    our price: $19.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0002SZV6I
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: What Is Enlightenment Press
    Sales Rank: 1651
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Re-Defining Spirituality For An Evolving World
    How would you like to read a thought-provoking magazine that is re-defining spirituality for an evolving world and is dedicated to a revolution in human consciousness and culture?

    What Is Enlightenment? provides a platform for a growing movement of evolutionary thinkers who share a sense of urgency about the need for human beings to transform, spiritually and ethically, in order to change the world. Through in-depth interviews, investigative reporting, cultural critique, and dialogue, What Is Enlightenment? asks the hard questions of the new science and the ancient traditions, art and culture, business and politics, in order to forge a coherent spiritual foundation for an increasingly chaotic world.

    Magazine founder and Editor-in-Chief Andrew Cohen has a tireless passion for spiritual inquiry. His always-evolving vision pushes the edge of contemporary thinking as many search for a radical new moral and philosophical architecture for the 21st Century. Cohen has brought together leading thinkers-mystics and materialists, philosophers and psychologists-to call for a higher and wholly contemporary synthesis of the spiritual truths found in the East and the empirical rigor of the West. He believes that spiritual transformation is not only an imperative for human evolution, but also for our very survival.

    Bringing forward the visions and voices of cosmologists and psychologists, scientists and social activists, as well as today's spiritual leaders and pioneers, What Is Enlightenment? seeks to create the largest possible context for understanding what it means to be a human being today.

    This is one of my absolute favorite magazines, especially as one who tends to view the world from an "everything connects to everything" perspective. I love the fascinating dialogues between Andrew Cohen and Ken Wilber in the The Guru And The Pandit section, as well as the insightful discussion of contemporary media (including books, movies, and board games), ancient culture, ethics, art, science, spirituality and more.

    A few of the questions that have been addressed in What Is Enlightenment? include:

    *Is sex an essential part of the spiritual path or is it an empty promise that distracts us from realizing our full human potential?
    *Is the ego our fiercest enemy on the spiritual path or our greatest ally in negotiating the vicissitudes of life?
    *Can scientific inquiry lead us to the same transcendent knowledge that the world's spiritual traditions speak of?
    *Are miracles real?
    *Will America be remembered as the architect of the world's first global democracy or as a power-hungry rogue nation that precipitates a tragedy of epic proportions?
    *How does significant change occur?
    *What does it mean to be in the world but not of it?
    *Is God a pacifist?

    Here are a few of the fascinating articles and reviews you'll find in What Is Enlightenment?:

    *A review of the movie What the #$*! Do We Know?!
    *Synchronicity Goes To Hollywood - Searching for a postmodern religion on the set of The Celestine Prophecy: The Movie
    *The Gospel According to Pop Culture - Buffy, Neo, and Dr. Seuss bring Christian morals to the mainstream
    *Naked on Stilts: Notes From Burning Man
    *If the Shoes Fit, Wear It - Sex and the City finds its moral footing!
    *In Search of a New Moral Compass
    *A Not-So-Trivial Pursuit - Enlighten: a new board game that puts you faith to the test
    *Real Men Have Broken Hearts - If thousands of Christians men can keep their promises, can they change the world?
    *Music Stirs More Masses Than You Think - From the Big Bang to Brahms, acoustic vibrations choreograph the movements of the cosmos

    Contributors to What Is Enlightenment? have included Byron Katie, Ram Dass, Don Beck, Father Thomas Keating, Eckhart Tolle, Duane Elgin, Ammachi, Jean Houston, Fritjof Capra and the Dalai Lama.

    One of the reasons I love this magazine so much is because its foundation is based on curiosity about the human predicament, as well as where we've been on the evolutionary ladder and where we are headed. I highly recommend What Is Enlightenment?, especially if you love to ponder the big questions of life, expand your awareness, and explore paths to integration and unity. ... Read more


    18. Realtor Magazine
    list price: $56.00
    our price: $58.48
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006KUMT
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Natl Assn Of Realtors
    Sales Rank: 1073
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    19. Parabola
    list price: $30.00
    our price: $31.37
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00007B9L0
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Soc For Study Myth & Tradition
    Sales Rank: 654
    Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars
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    Abstract


    Essays, poems, commentary, reviews and selections from the world's myths, folklore and spiritual heritage and in depth issues on concerns of the day.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (5)

    5-0 out of 5 stars great stuff
    Anyone willing to enlarge their understanding of themselves and their place on a planet that urgently requires us all to listen to and appreciate each other, will find at least one, if not many offerings in any issue of this thought provoking and consistently well rounded publication that will illuminate a mystery, spark a quest, satisfy a deeply felt hunger for insight and meaning, or re-sanctify the common day. True, some might ask if we really need the unnervingly nebulous and impractical "nonsense" of myth and lore, of mystery, imagination, art and symbol. As Joseph Campbell is said to have remarked, any hound can live an apparently satisfactory life without the slightest need or desire for all this, and that is perfectly fine, but it is, after all, a hound's life.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Would be Funny if it Wasn't Just Sad
    I am an open minded, thoughtful person, interested in new viewpoints if well argued. I received this magazine subscription as a gift, and thought that perhaps there might be some genuinely insightful creative thinking within it. What it actually contains, however, is a bunch of utter nonsense, which essentially teaches that it's OK to do whatever you want; that there is some type of 'spirituality' you can embrace to allow you to do what you wish, while simultaneously feeling good about yourself. If you are looking for substance go elsewhere.

    This theme of self congratulatory, self esteem at any cost runs like a vein throughout these pages, a perfect example of spirituality without genuine commitment. I read through the latest edition, which claimed to be about marriage, but really was about how to destroy marriage as an institution. On the cover of the issue, for your further enlightenment, is a painting of a bride, groom, and giant rooster, with musical accompaniment by a goat playing a cello. It is actually a painting by Marc Chagall, titled 'The Bride and Groom of the Eiffel Tower', and here evidently used to promote any variety of alternative marital arrangements. For badly reasoned doubletalk you can't get much worse than "Parabola." Here, for instance, is a direct quote, ostensibly on the subject of marriage, taken from page 17 of the Spring 2004 edition: "Sovereignty develops when two partners grow into a marriage wholeheartedly, with commitment. Conversely, marriage grows from the development of autonomy. This dynamic is subsumed within the persons of the triple goddess, with the crone meditating the information's passage."

    So is that all clear now? Basically, what we have here is a bunch of self indulgent polytheists telling you to do what you want, that every religion is equal, and that every set of beliefs, no matter how preposterously based, is equal. If you actually believe that, than this is the PERFECT magazine for you. If you believe that there are standards of good, evil, right, and wrong this is not the magazine for you. You will also want to check out the sponsors of the magazine, one of which I just have to mention (even though most are worthy of a mention) here. On the back cover is a big, color advertisement for "Uniting Inner and Outer: A Sufi Conference" which contains this delicious, and enlightening line: "This container of love for different Sufi Orders will continue at this year's conference, with the theme of uniting the inner and outer. Through lectures, meditation, music, dance, dreamwork, and zikr we will share in this tradition of lovers." Please excuse my absence: I plan to be doing something productive those three days.

    I am absolutely in favor of people being able to believe whatever they want, whatever they have reasoned for themselves. Likewise, when I see people printing preposterous propositions based on self indulgent egoism, I have the right to call it like I see it, so here is how I see it: This is nonsense.

    5-0 out of 5 stars beyond the usual intelligence
    a lovely magazine filled with insights that go beyond just about anything else. The spectrum of human mystical/spiritual experience is covered with eloquence and uniqueness.

    I wish magazines like this were available when I'm waiting to have my teeth worked on or my car fixed. The human mind is polluted by so much sports and celebrity trash - that works like this end up soothing the soul and revivifying the mind.

    Editors - you have done a brilliant job, indeed.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Myth, tradition and the search for meaning
    I first discovered Parabola about ten years ago. This is a magazine (more of a book, really) that is filled with meaning, and as well it should be, because the point of the periodical is to clarify meaning, in myth, in symbol, in language, in song, and in the essence of meaning itself.

    Now, before you start thinking, 'My goodness, this is just too esoteric for me!' do ponder the various parts of your daily life. You are surrounded by meaningful symbols, that this magazine might possibly help you appreciate more.

    Why do we stop at a red light, and go at a green light, rather than the other way round?

    There is a symbolism inherent here. Our daily life is a fight for consciousness against the deadening factors of existence; this magazine can be one more tool in the arsenal of helping to stay awake.

    'Whoa! Too mystical for me!'

    Not really. At least, not always. In preparing my review of a book on Sufi practices, I pulled an issue off the shelf from 1997, whose theme is Conscience and Consciousness. This has a lead article on the Sufi way of understanding by Tim Winter, entitled The Saint with Seven Tombs -- in it, he combines reflection on poetry, calligraphy, geography and history to weave an interesting and enlightening story of Sufi practice. Beyond this article, it includes writings on social, cultural, and worship practices from across the world: Michael Tobias writes on Islands of Nonviolence, emphasising the ecological peacefulness in the philosophies in India; Roger Lipsey explores the thought and philosophy of Dag Hammarskjöld on matters of conscience, and others go off on tangents (there is even a section entitled Tangent).

    Included in each edition are many book reviews which explore topics related to the theme of the issue, as well as the more general themes of Parabola, being thought and philosophy, myth and meaning, spirituality and humanity. This is an extraordinarily rich collection of essays that come regularly.

    It is my pleasure to have had this item added to Epinions. For over twenty-five years, Parabola has covered the spiritual and cultural traditions of the world in art, essay, and story. There are occasional interviews as well. They also publish books, one of which was recently chosen by a distinguished panel as one of the hundred best spiritual books of the century, And there was light, by Jacques Lusseyran, blind hero of the French Resistance.

    This is a wonderful magazine. Search for it, and find some meaning.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Magazine
    This magazine does a wonderful job of approaching myth from all fronts. From psychology to spirituality, there are many views presented. This makes for wonderful reading and insights. If you like Carl Jung or Joseph Campbell you'll probably enjoy this publication. ... Read more


    20. Poetry
    list price: $35.00
    our price: $37.80
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006KT0A
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Modern Poetry Association
    Sales Rank: 631
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    Abstract


    Poetry, commentary news notes and lists of recently published books published by the Modern Poetry Association.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (4)

    3-0 out of 5 stars heres what i think
    this mag totally bores me. i mean, i like lyric poetry somewhat but when will POETRY start representing concrete and spatial poetics every now and then?

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Best English-Language Poetry Magazine in the World.
    Poetry magazine out of Chicago has been around since stew was invented. (When mankind first crawled up out of the swamp and discovered fire, what they had for dinner that night was stew). Well, ok, they're 75 years old and counting. You don't hang around that long unless you're the best. I first discovered them in a college library - many, many years worth of copies - it was a treasure trove of the 1st magnitude. There's invariably one or more poems (if not the majority)in each issue that'll make you glad you subscribed. No, they're not big on pictures (none but the cover - and I remember one year when it was a drawing that didn't change for the whole year...urg) - but it IS the best Poetry Magazine you will ever find.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good Poetry, Plenty of Variety
    I like Poetry Magazine mainly because there is a variety of different poets and styles. There is always something different. This magazine has been around for awhile, and from what I have read in the newspaper about the huge amount of money they just received they are being careful and are making sure they make the right decisions. It will be interesting to see what the future holds for them.
    I certainly hope they don't change the size or shape of the publication. It is the perfect size to carry in your purse just in case you want something to read as you wait in line or run your errands. I like the style of the magazine, it suits the topic.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good, but...
    POETRY is fantastic, and I've always loved it, and I'd never say a word against it. No, no. But if somebody left me a hundred million dollars, I'd get just a wee bit jazzier. I mean, for god's sakes. I understand staying true to your origins, but you can at least get some pictures or something. For a hundred million, you could print issues on babylonian scrolls. You could have every page play music to accompany the poems. Where are the holograms? Where's the perfumed fold-out centerpieces? Where's the frontispiece of fine Indian silk? For crying out loud, who made these poets so damned austere? I thought you people were hedonists and sybarites. I expected you people to blow half this hundred mil right away, re-enacting the Iliad or something. But noooo.... You have to be sensible, just like everybody else in the world today. Forget you, Poetry. Take care of your 401Ks and your KEOUGHs and your TIAA-CREFs. You're just like the rest of them, you sell-outs. You mutual-fund buying push-overs. I'm heartbroken. I thought you poets were the last vestige of impracticality in America; but you've shown yourselves to be real solid folk. Wouldn't your fathers be proud. Isn't Berryman smiling in his grave? Or Walt Whitman. Or John Ashberry. (Is he dead yet?) Forget it, Poetry. You've let me down. I expected opulence; I expected a party that only poets could throw. I expected a celebration of life worth at least 30-40 mil. I give up. Nevermind. I still enjoyed the issue, however. Fine work. Keep it up. ... Read more


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