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    $34.95 list($59.96)
    1. Make: Technology on Your Time
    $19.95 list($59.88)
    2. Discover
    $24.97 list($59.40)
    3. Scientific American
    $34.00 list($47.40)
    4. National Geographic Magazine
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    5. Popular Mechanics
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    6. Popular Science
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    7. National Geographic Adventure
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    9. Horse Illustrated
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    10. Archaeology
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    11. Bird Talk
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    12. National Geographic en Espanol
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    13. Science News
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    14. Aviation Week & Space Technology
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    15. Diabetes Forecast
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    18. Bird Watchers Digest
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    19. Birders World
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    20. Birds & Blooms

    1. Make: Technology on Your Time
    list price: $59.96
    our price: $34.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0007RNI5K
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Oreilly Media % Next Steps Mar
    Sales Rank: 4
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Reviews (4)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Restoring Dignity and Nobility to the term "Hacker"
    O'Reilly Publishing has been on an almost solo crusade it seems to elevate the word "hacker" to its former dignity and nobility.

    The media has co-opted the term and used it for any variety of malicious computer programmer or Internet malcontent. I myself am guilty of "mis-using" the term and have even written that the hacker purists should just get used to it (see What Is In A Name?.

    But, the roots of hacking are more benign. Hacking is about being clever, not malicious. Pure hackers set out to be ingenious, not notorious. The O'Reilly Hacks series of books is devoted to this interpretation of hacking and now true hackers who just want to know how things work under the hood and tinker with them to create new inventions of their own have a magazine to help them.

    The beginning contains a lot of newsy sort of tid bits that describe various hacking projects or hacker tales, but don't include the complete details. For example, there are a few photos and a brief rundown of the home monorail system Kim Pederson built in his backyard. Five years, $4,000 (USD), and 300 feet of track later his monorail glides around his backyard with ease.

    The middle section provides a handful of full-fledged projects, complete with an inventory of the materials and tools necessary, full details for how to construct it and illustrations to guide you.

    If you are interested in hacking and learning how to convert and modify gadgets and gizmos to do your bidding, check out this magazine. If you have done some of your own hacking projects already, contact the editor to see about publishing it in an upcoming edition of Make.

    Tony Bradley is a consultant and writer with a focus on network security, antivirus and incident response. He is the About.com Guide for Internet / Network Security (http://netsecurity.about.com), providing a broad range of information security tips, advice, reviews and information. Tony also contributes frequently to other industry publications. For a complete list of his freelance contributions you can visit Essential Computer Security (http://www.tonybradley.com).

    5-0 out of 5 stars a geeky blend of all my favorite mags
    I just received the premiere issue of Make Magazine from O'Reilly yesterday. Let me just say this mag is a geek's dream come true. It's not a magazine about coding. Heck, I'm not sure if calling it a magazine is even accurate. It's more of a journal or zine (but with higher production values). A geek quarterly, if you will.

    For example... the premiere issue features an article on aerial photography. Not geeky enough for you? Ok, how about aerial photography accomplished by rigging up a camera to a kite? Still not geeky enough? Throw in a homemade mechanism for triggering the shutter from the ground. The best part is, this isn't just an article full of theory. These guys DO this stuff. The article is full of pictures, plans and step by step instructions on how to make it happen.

    That's not all... other How-To articles include: making a 5-in-1 network cable, making a magnetic stripe reader, XM Radio hacks, tips and tricks for your IPOD, gmail hacks, IPAQ hacks and a lot more. This puppy is just under 200 pages of D-I-Y technology.

    Still not geeky enough? How about an article on how to make your own railgun, using magnets, a ruler and some steel bearings? There's also an article about hacking robotic dogs to sniff out toxic waste. This is geek goodness in all it's glory.

    If you like reading 2600 (the hacker quarterly), Maximum PC and Scientific American, roll them all into one and you have Make (but without the attitude of Maximum PC and the leetspeak of 2600). I'm gonna subscribe!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A geeky winner!
    Make: Technology on Your Own Time is not a book... exactly. It's a mook, which is a hybrid of a magazine and a book. It's a magazine, but not a typical one. In my initial perusal, I think I wasn't high on it because I'm not into home projects because I don't have time.

    I read it closely. Shortly, I became engaged and enjoyed reading the articles. Though I don't plan to make anything (like I'm going to put a monorail in my backyard-yes, this is a real project), the stories and the writing drew me in.

    I like geeky things, but I'm not a geek in terms of building computers from scratch and hacking gadgets. These are the kinds of projects covered in the mook. The premiere issue includes the following projects: magnetic stripe card reader, camera on a kite, $14 video camera stabilizer or buy one, and a 5-in-1 network cable.

    The quarterly mook has a Web site with things not covered in the print edition as well as a blog. Its design is clever with color codes on the cover and side for the major projects. The initial issue has 192 pages of quality paper and color printing to justify $8.74 an issue.

    The mook has a homemade yet professional feel and has "home improvement" style fonts to add to its DIY (do-it-yourself) theme. The photos give the impression they're taken by average people and not photographers. They're good quality and complement the articles.

    People who don't have time to build and like technology will find it an engrossing read thanks to the personable writing and instructions that don't make eyes glaze. Few new magazines make it past the first year or so. Make should thrive for years to come.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic guide to cool projects
    I've been waiting for this magazine all my life. Finally, it's here. There are enough ideas in here to keep me busy for the next several months, and even if I don't plan on building everything in it, it's a lot of fun just reading about how other people are making stuff.

    It's more like a paperback book than a magazine, and there are very few ads in it, which means there's lot of room for plenty of do it yourself projects. ... Read more


    2. Discover
    list price: $59.88
    our price: $19.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005N7PT
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Disney Magazine Publishing
    Sales Rank: 11
    Average Customer Review: 4.38 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    From Amazon.com

    Science rules the headlines these days, with new developments each week in genetics, astrophysics, computers, and medicine, and Discover is a great way to get a broad spectrum of science news. Designed for the general reader, Discover translates and interprets many of the same stories professionals peruse in Scientific American. Accessible articles on genetically engineered food, what's living in your pillows, real robots in action, and what makes a Stradivarius sing add up to a truly delightful family science magazine. Each issue brings to light new and newsworthy topics to stimulate dinnertime and water-cooler conversations beyond the mundane, and Discover spices the mix with puzzles, Web links, book reviews, and experiments for amateur scientists.
    --Therese Littleton
    ... Read more

    Reviews (26)

    5-0 out of 5 stars My Window to Science.
    Discover magazine regularly keeps me informed about a broad range of scientific fields. The articles are written and presented in an organized well-edited style, with some terminology but yet still readily accessible to laymen and the curious (you will not feel that you are presented information in a watered-down form). Discover can practically satisfy anyone's interest. In it you will find material on archeology, anthropology and human origins, physics, astronomy, biology, chemistry, genetics, neuroscience, psychology, zoology, medicine, and much more. Articles about politics, environmental conservation, and technology are commonly found in Discover issues as well.

    As many magazines do, Discover has permanent sections devoted to a particular type of information such as "Letter" section at the beginning of the magazine with readers' feedback on previous issue, "R&D" where you'll find concisely written briefings on scientific research and developments, "Discover Dialogue" section with a prominent researcher discussing important issues, "Reviews" section for books, "Resources" that provides an additional information about topics that are featured in an issue, "Emerging Technologies, "Vital Signs" with ER-like stories and other departments. And last but not least, featured articles (usually 6 total) are almost always a pleasure to read and it should be the main purpose of buying this magazine in the first place. I should also mention good illustrations, graphs, and some average-quality photography that Discover offers to its readers.

    You should shop around for a good subscription price. A good place to start is amagarea dot com that acts as a search engine for magazine subscriptions from various magazine sellers and re-sellers. $10 should be an average price for this particular subscription.

    All in all I highly recommend Discover. I am also subscribed to Scientific American and National Geographic. Discover stays firmly with them on the same level.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Only magzine I always read cover to cover
    Discover is well written well edited magazine for the scientificly curious. I like the format which covers news, papers and editorial statements. Discover is very readable and has topics that are both practical and theroetical in nature.

    I love that it reports on all the sciences. As well it has a wide range of articles for many different levels of the scientific mind.

    It challenges the reader but one can be farily non-scietnific and still read it. I us it as a sorce window into the sciences that I am not focused on such as biology and physics. But as well it has beautiful articles on chemistry and engineering. As well the issues are about interesting topics, which is on a genreal level. It is a great place to look if you want a genreal overview of new theories in the relm of science.

    I like its dedicated sections like vital signs which are case studies about medical incidents.

    As well I love the R and D news at the beginning. It is nice to see what is out there. The main articles are consise and not overwelming. As well you are often referred to article that are a priori and overwelming if you want to delve farther. I read each issue before the next one comes a rarity in the world of magazines.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Evolution
    I was one of the charter subscribers in the early 1980's, and have watched this magazine go through a number of incarnations. All that other reviewers here say about the "People" approach, and the lack of pure science, is true...but it has always been true to a greater or lesser degree. I find the insight into issues as well as science interesting and informative. What has changed is the decidedly political tone the magazine has acquired in the last three years or so. This is dangerous for this reason: by the nature of the editorial policy, there is rarely hard science to stand behind the 'commentary' inbedded in an article. Highly contraversial issues, not infrequently, are presented as statements of fact. The tilt is 'green' and is most visible on issues involving the environment. Scientifically unproven but politically popular (with the readers, one presumes) sentiments and ideas are presented with token or no rebuttal and at times as unchallenged premises for some conclusion. This is not bad or good, but it isn't science-based debate and discussion, either. One begins to feel one is being 'educated' rather than 'challenged'. Sum: This is a magazine that will present a theory clearly and in English and is enjoyable to read...I still subscribe and will continue to...but not one that will make much effort to dispute or refute a theory that is editorially favored and/or 'reader friendly'.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Science without the Science
    Discover is a very successful magazine, and it acheived that success with a formula that owes as much to the example of "People" magazine as it does to anything. It manages with cover all sorts of cutting edge stories without ever actually getting into the actual science involved. Instead, it concentrates on the people involved, the politics, the history... anything but the science.

    Here's an example: A recent issue had an interesting piece on the physics of rocks skipping... expect it wasn't on the physics of rock skipping so much as it was on a particular fellow was was the world's champion rock skipper. Yes, there *was* a formula in a side bar that purported to describe the physics of a skipping rock, and some of the terms were even defined... but there was no explanation of the formula, or even any numbers. It was simple "Here's a formula. It's very impressive looking, isn't it? Now on to other things." And there was some history of how people looked at rock skipping, and even some allusions to how the physics of rock skipping had applications in understanding the physics of other phenomena. But what you couldn't find in the entire article was a single sentance that actually discussed the physics involved!

    So what Discovery really is, is a magazine about science and scientists that doesn't actually have any science in it. And while there's a place for that sort of thing, if you're looking for actual discussions of science and technology that are still presented in a way that the educated non-scientist can understand, you'd be far better off with New Scientist or Science Week. And if a few equations wouldn't scare you off, American Scientist.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent magazine
    Just recieved my first copy and just love it! Easy reading without "dumbing down". ... Read more


    3. Scientific American
    list price: $59.40
    our price: $24.97
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005QDWG
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Scientific American
    Sales Rank: 21
    Average Customer Review: 4.16 out of 5 stars
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    From Amazon.com

    For working scientists, especially in high-tech fields, there are only a few crucial nonjournal periodicals to pore over faithfully, and Scientific American is one of them--its timely and technical features on everything from paleoarchaeology to neural nets set it apart from popular science magazines like Discover. Scientific American emphasizes a wide variety of emerging technologies, giving scientists a chance to keep up in an increasingly specialized professional world. Innovative and controversial developments such as gene patenting and the latest from the unified field gurus are front and center in every issue. It's not all business, though--regular features like Michael Shermer's "Skeptic" column, enticing book reviews, brain-busting puzzles, and James Burke's intellectual-historical meanderings add browsability to this enduring magazine, in business reporting the frontiers of scientific exploration for more than 150 years. --Therese Littleton ... Read more

    Reviews (31)

    5-0 out of 5 stars The go-to science magazine
    Scientific American has been in existence for more than 150 years; admittedly in its earlier years it was more about mechanical inventions and the like. But since the late 1940s, if I remember correctly, it has been the non-journal magazine that one goes to for in-depth articles from all areas of science. The articles are written by experts in their fields, usually the men and women who did some of the important research referred to in the article. Of inestimable value, particularly for non-scientists (or for scientists reading in fields other than their own), are the superb illustrations. In fact, one way the magazine has improved over the years is in its ability to illustrate complex scientific concepts graphically. And since the inception of computer graphics that aspect of the magazine has gotten even better.

    I will admit that I still miss the articles by Philip and Phylis Morrison, and the mathematical column by Martin Gardner (and later, Douglas Hoffstadter), but new regulars like the 'Skeptic' writer Michael Shermer, the cartoonist Roz Chast, and humor columnist Steve Mirsky enliven its pages. And I've always enjoyed the '50, 100 & 150 Years Ago' column that excerpts articles from past issues.

    It is hard to imagine my own life without Scientific American; I've subscribed for most of the past fifty years.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Broad and Interesting Science
    I really enjoy this magazine. It provides excellent articles, well written from a scientific perspective, in an easily understood manner, on a wide variety of topics. The drawings and photographs are always well done and help one understand the material better. I found it the kind of magazine that I didn't read cover to cover, as my scientific interest is more limited to the biological than the physical or chemical- so some articles I skipped over. But it's designed to be very all-encompassing, and therefore has a bit of something for everyone (with a scientific bent). It lets the layman keep up on scientific events, as well as the scientist who wants to know what's going on in fields outside her own. And beyond this, there are some excellent features: Ask the Experts allows people to write in to find out about different minutia of science, like what makes spider silk strong or what deja vu is. Fuzzy Logic are very witty cartoons about science. And my favorite by far is near the beginning of every issue, in which Scientific American repeats snippets of articles from 50, 100, and now 150 years ago (it's an *old* magazine!). So here you read about the benefits of DDT as it is just coming out, or the plague of tuberculosis, or the very beginnings of fish tagging (the fish couldn't swim that well with the tags), or how we are sure that, contrary to current scientific opinion, volcanoes are not caused by water, as there is no water on the moon, yet it is obvious to everyone that it is much more volcanic than the earth! (The last was from 150 years ago, thankfully.)

    3-0 out of 5 stars good science but often boring and annoyingly political
    I hate that this SCIENCE mag is often political and it's not really written for human interest, I prefer DISCOVER.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Informative Info on Social and Physical Sciences
    Scientific American is a good magazine for those who enjoy reading about modern science, advancement in technology and medicine, economic improvements, and anything else of a scientific nature. Each issue is about 130 pages in length and can be counted on to stimulate your intellectual curiosity.

    One thing that makes Scientific American more appealing than other science magazines is the fact that it includes articles on more than just the physical sciences, like physics, chemistry, geology, etc. It also contains timely and informative articles on social sciences, like economics and politics. This adds a lot to the magazine's appeal, and it's one of the main reasons why I choose to read it each month.

    One thing that might bother some potential readers of this magazine is that Scientific American does tend to present a mostly pro- government angle on the social and human interest stories that it presents. In almost every instance, the writers of Scientific American draw the immediate conclusion that only the government can possibly solve the pressing issues of the day. They don't even give much consideration to anything else. They immediately concede most any problem to the authority of the state.

    In spite of the "liberal" leanings, however, I feel that Scientific American is still a very good publication to read. It includes puzzles that test your knowledge of science, book reviews on recent scientific book releases, and some good, well- written articles about science and how it relates to our day- to- day life. It's a good magazine for those who like to stay informed.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Attack of the Marketers
    Twenty years ago, a Scientific American cover consisted of the magazine's title, date, and an illustration or photo connected to one of the articles..., they were often astoundingly beautiful. Now the cover is bloated with sensational copy that seems aimed at pushing sales. Topic choice seems to be driven more by marketing concerns as well. I still read it, but..., ... Read more


    4. National Geographic Magazine
    list price: $47.40
    our price: $34.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005NIOH
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: National Geographic Society
    Sales Rank: 8
    Average Customer Review: 4.57 out of 5 stars
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    Abstract


    Articles deal with interesting people, places, customs, activities and nature on a worldwide scale.Also covers National GeographicSociety expeditions and discoveries.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (44)

    5-0 out of 5 stars In Response to "International Geographic"
    Not certain I understand the fuss about National Geographic covering so many international geographic topics and issues.

    1. Hello! The magazine is the journal of the NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY. (You think Scientific American won't cover the Nobel Prize because it is awarded in Sweden?)
    2. Geography is about spatial analysis and scale. Geographic issues cannot be contained within a single formal regional border. (For example, can you really look at El Paso, TX, without investigating it's relationshiip to Ciudad Juarez right across the border?)
    3. My family has been reading this magazine for 50 years. It has always covered the entire world, as "GEOGRAPHY" means 'a description of the world'.
    4. What about newer features such as ZIP CODE, which covers in detail one single micro-region of the US.
    5. To say that it should primarily cover the US is a surprisingly narrow, US-centric view of what really matters in the world. This is the point of view that explains the sad state of complete geographic knowledge in the US.

    But enough of that. Still the best magazine, not just for us Geography majors, but for seeing how geography fits into the entire academic world. If you want to know how sense of space and place is related to physical and natural science, as well as politics, economics, anthropology and history, this is the best value for the money.

    4-0 out of 5 stars SHOULD BE CALLED INTERNATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC...
    National Geographic, a glossy, first class publication, takes the reader on a tour around the world to new or far away places. It is broad in scope with well written, matter of fact articles on diverse subjects that are sure to appeal to armchair explorers everywhere. These articles are lavishly illustrated by beautiful photographs that augment the articles in a meaningful way. It is also a wonderful reference magazine for school children and the incessant projects that they must complete. This informative, though somewhat staid, magazine will appeal to those who are interested in history, animals, geography, science, other cultures, and exploration. It is not a magazine written with an eye towards adventure. For that one should look to Outside magazine.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Keeps the earth spinning
    We have been subscribing to National Geographic for over 25 years. No other magazine covers such a wide range of topics, with consistently excellent photographs and journalism.

    It is a useful reference guide for school projects, especially with the map inserts.

    Being chock full of information has the downside of being very heavy. If every household were to simultaneously incinerate all the issues in their possession, not only would the cloud of smoke obscure the sun and cause another ice age, but the earth would suddenly be so light that it might float off its axis.

    The moral: Save the Planet - hang on to your National Geographics.

    5-0 out of 5 stars In Depth Factual Stories, Brilliant Photographs
    I have read issues of National Geographic that date back to the last century. In those early times the articles were often more sterile and factual, but still just as interesting. In many cases those articles are more interesting today, because we see the world of then through the eyes of the relatively objective viewers of then.

    Geography covers more than just land masses and forests. National Geographic is not about "national," it is about our entire universe; National Geographic refers to "The National Geographic Society," rather than the breadth of coverage. In the decades that I have been reading National Geographic, articles have covered everything from the Earth's core, to the deepest oceans, to the people living on the land and the land itself, the mountains and skies above us, and the whole universe. Warning: if you are a creationist then I would avoid this magazine.

    The breadth of the magazine is well matched by its depth. Articles in the last decades have covered genes, atomic science, microbial life, how remote sensing technologies work, lasers, frequencies, such as those that make up color and the all the invisible spectra, and so many more that it is impossible to list them in a 1000 word review. Virtually every major issue possible to be covered that is related to geography has had at least one article in Geographic, and thousands of not-so-major issues. There was even an article on holography!

    The core of the magazine is still geography as we grew up believing geography to be. There have been articles on Lake Baikal, a wonderful trek through the still wild and swampy jungles of Africa, excellent articles on caves and national parks of all nations, glorious color pictures of undersea life and animals of all shapes, sizes and description, and the ever popular insects and arachnids, to name but a fraction.

    National Geographic has always been famous for the pictures. A recent addition to the magazine has been a brief article describing a picture that did not quite make the cut for a featured article. The brief summary explains why the editor, writer or photographer was enamored of a particular picture, and why the picture was not used in the article. This article provides a wonderful insight into the marriage of photography and prose for each article in every magazine; a primer for would-be editors.

    While National Geographic does have an environmental lean in reporting, it is remarkably balanced. The needs of affected populations such as fisherman, farmers, and people in general are reported alongside commentary on how people have damaged an ecosystem or caused the extinction of another species. There always seems to be a note of glee when the needs of ecology and the needs of people are in balance or when people have benefited from improving or guarding an ecosystem.

    There are few adult magazines that I feel are sufficiently balanced in their reporting that I am comfortable providing unlimited access to children. While there are occasional articles that are quite bloody, which is to be expected when dealing with humans and animals, the blood is real and not staged. While I would not expose a very young child to such imagery, older children need to learn of the realities of the world. I remember when I was first exposed to National Geographic 40 years ago I found some of the images disturbing, but those same images helped prepared me for some of the harsh realities of life outside my home, my city, my country and even my solar system and galaxy.

    National Geographic has been an important magazine in my life for about 40 years. I was fortunate to go to a high school with magazines that dated back more than 70 years, and spent many free hours reading those old magazines, with all black and white photographs. What an incredible perspective this magazine gives us on the world and how we and our knowledge have changed in the course of the last 100 years. What a wonderful way to discover those changes. This excellent and educational magazine is for those interested in people, science, geography, the world, and the universe.

    5-0 out of 5 stars AGAIN! National Geographic take a break! Put your feet up!
    WOW! National Geographic AGAIN they do a terrific job on something! They do great, professional, and BREATHTAKING jobs on everything they do but this is the best of everything. I suscribed to this about two months ago and was very happy about their progress. I'm sure thousands agree with me that this is perefection and I'm surprised anybody or anything can do this much. Put your feet up National Geographic! You've done enough for thirty years!!!

    Enjoy,
    Jeffrey Alan Cote'

    (brazilgamer_tacomawa) ... Read more


    5. Popular Mechanics
    list price: $42.00
    our price: $12.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005N7SA
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Hearst Magazines
    Sales Rank: 27
    Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    From Amazon.com

    With plenty of features on the latest high-tech cars, tools, sports gear, and military developments, Popular Mechanics is the source for discriminating gadget heads. Full-page ads for spark plugs, extrastrong glues, and manly cigarettes fuel the magazine's testosterone engine, and many of the how-to articles are designed to help today's male achieve maximum speed, efficiency, and style in his leisure activities. In-depth articles on the history of the baseball glove, comparison tests of mulching mowers, and a list of the cables you'll need to build a home network join brief news bites covering science, outdoors, and home improvement. With a copy of Popular Mechanics and a fat wallet, you could be the alpha male you've always wanted to be! --Therese Littleton ... Read more

    Reviews (3)

    2-0 out of 5 stars Too many hand gun ads for me...
    I received a subscription for Christmas last year as it seemed like a pretty broad based magazine with lots of good articles on a variety of topics. And that is absolutely true - however, I ultimately cancelled due to the number of advertisements for hand guns. Call me what you will (and yes, I'm from that bastion of liberalism, Massachusetts) but I could not support a periodical that advertises these items. Just my own personal feelings on this matter.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Jack-of-All-Trades Magazine
    Popular Mechanics is a Jack-of-All-Trades Magazine. I have been an avid reader since high school picking up every other issue or so at local newsstands. I only recently finally got smart and picked up a subscription. For the price you can't go wrong. PM is filled with informative articles on everything ranging from new technology, world events, woodworking tips, car care, automotive design, and computers. PM does not delve to deep into any particular subject, rather it gives you a broad view of all of them.

    In each issue your likely to find tips on how to change and fix a flat tire on your car, plans on how to build wood furniture, reviews on new cars, and reports on upcoming technology. The articles are always interesting and provide enough information to let you do a little more digging if the subject matter sparks your interest. Jay Leno even writes an automotive section that is always enjoyable to read.

    The product reviews are informative and have helped me with numerous purchases ranging from new cars, snow blowers, power tools, dirt bikes and the like. I would recommend this magazine to anyone interested in any of the mentioned subjects but can't afford 40 different subscriptions to cover them all.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Covers all the bases
    For me, this magazine has it all: technology, automotive, aviation, boats, home repair, and much more. It gives a great overview of what is happening in many industries and hobbies. I have generally read the entire issue two days after I have received it, and I don't have a lot of free time for reading.

    One of the best aspects of this magazine is that is does not take itself too seriously. It does a great job creating articles that are informative and detailed, but leaves room for fun and offbeat topics too.

    Last year Popular Mechanics readers got to follow a PM sponsored NASCAR car. This year they have switched to a top fuel dragster. These articles give you a good behind the sense look at what it takes to race these impressive vehicles.

    If racing is not your style, checkout the woodworking section where a myriad of woodworking projects are presented. Don't forget their annual woodworkers special with a whole host of plans in a single issue.

    Got a leaky water heater? Check the home repair section. Car on the fritz? Check the auto repair section. Wondering what is new in the military? Watch for the frequent special articles on the Special Forces and their hardware. This magazine has a great deal to offer!

    For an all around look at technology and all things mechanical, you can't beat Popular Mechanics! ... Read more


    6. Popular Science
    list price: $47.88
    our price: $14.97
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005N7SC
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Time4Media
    Sales Rank: 38
    Average Customer Review: 4.59 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Abstract


    Articles on products for homes, transportation and recreation, including automobiles, boats, tools & garden, electronic, photographic equipment and television.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (17)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful discovery
    Popular Science entered my household during the past year via our resident seventh grader. I must admit that I had not picked up a copy of the magazine in a few decades (since I was a seventh grader?), but it has quickly become one of my favorites (no fights yet over who gets to read it first, however). I can't say enough about the magazine itself: In short, it has adapted its content to a Men's Health-influenced architechture, editorial sensibility and pace. Great writing ranging from two sentence "cool gadet" finds to indepth investigative journalism offer the reader plenty of pleasurable surprises in each issue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best Mag
    For me this magazine is good for learning what the newest gadget out there is. Alot of fun to see the new inventions in it. Also there is lots to read on subjects like NASA's progress on light speed, this was a good article and very imformative. I'd say for your money's worth this is a good magazine not just for you but for your children as well. I've been reading Popular Science since I was in junior high. I've also gotten ideas for projects in school and have used it for information many times.

    5-0 out of 5 stars fun for gadget enthusiasts
    Much better than WIRED. deals in realities and up and coming tech.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Meh
    I used to love reading my parents subscription to this magazine... but it seems to have been watered down significantly over the last decade. Anymore, after the "gee whiz" factor wears off, I am not left with any real feeling of substance of signficant scientific insight.

    5-0 out of 5 stars outstanding
    very good just amazing great stuff you will be wanting more after you read it awesome ... Read more


    7. National Geographic Adventure
    list price: $39.50
    our price: $14.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005Q7DY
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: National Geographic Society
    Sales Rank: 109
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (10)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Worth the price of admission...
    This is probably one of the best magazines that you can subscribe to if you love any or all of the following: traveling, adventure, the outdoors, travel journals, great pictures of fantastic scenery or reading about any of the above. I have subscribed to this magazine for a while and there's never an issue that arrives in my mailbox in which I don't find at least one full article and two shorter articles that are enjoyable to read as well as informative. This magazine has inspired me to be even more adventurous on my next journey, whether it be domestic or international. But until, then, I can enjoy exciting travels vicariously through the authors of this publication. Kudos to National Geographic for really filling a void that "Outside" or "Backpacker" seem to leave.

    5-0 out of 5 stars National Geographic Adventure
    I don't know what the person was thinking who reviewed this magazine (Jan 2004) and said he had cancelled his subscription of 15 years. This magazine only first began publication a few years ago. I have every issue and have loved and read every one. Adventure is the best of the National Geographic publications and is for those who are young or at least young at heart. Some of the articles are a bit sassy -- but just enough to make them fun!

    3-0 out of 5 stars Not what it used to be.
    I have just cancelled my subscription to National Geographic Magazine after 15 years of membership. Regrettably the magazine has lost its former lustre and has become too americanized and too focussed upon 911 and the two wars in the middle east. I need a magazine that is truely worldly in scope and covers nature and cultural diversity. My search led me to three candidates: Geo Magazine - good but not available in english; Geographical - british, good but a little shallow; and finally I settled upon CNN Traveller - an excellent magazine to which I am now subscribed and is all and more than what National Geographic used to be. I just wish more publishers would give National Geographic some competition.

    Paul

    5-0 out of 5 stars Must read for the experienced or wanna-be adventure traveler
    Biking, skiing, running, canoeing, hiking, kayaking: you name it it has you covered. Great tips and ideas for your first or next adventure vacation to any corner of the globe. If you are serious about or seriously considering getting out of the house and living life, this magazine is a must read! All this and a great price too.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I travel as much as I would like so.....
    I travel vicariously through National Geographic Adventure. A great magazine to sit, read and dream of an adventure. ... Read more


    8. Zoobooks

    our price: $20.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006L2Z8
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Wildlife Education Ltd
    Sales Rank: 224
    Average Customer Review: 3.33 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Abstract


    Children's magazine presenting articles on animals and nature.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (3)

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Magazine For ALL Animal Lovers!!
    This magazine is great for the animal lover; fantastic photography, amazing facts, and fun activities! This magazine has absolutely no advertisements and is handy to have around if you have an animal report or project (it has facts that I have never ever known before!)to look up in for information. This magazine has beautifully illustrated diagrams and full color photographs! A DEFINATE MUST-HAVE FOR THE ANIMAL LOVER!!!!!

    1-0 out of 5 stars Very Disappointed
    We never receive the zoo books, so I am not sure how they are illustrated. My son is very disappointed. I hope no one else orders from Zoo books, and if you have I hope you have not had the same problems as us. I have never had any problems with any of the merchants from Amazon.com. Hopefully since I never receive the Magazine as promise after emails and phone calls to them, they can at least reimburse us for the purchase amount.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great magazine!
    This is a wonderful magazine for a number of reasons: there's no advertising, it has wonderful photography, and in-depth information on the animals profiled in each issue. The language is simple enough for younger readers to enjoy, and colorful enough to keep older readers interested. Anyone with a love of animals would be delighted with this magazine. ... Read more


    9. Horse Illustrated
    list price: $42.00
    our price: $12.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005NIO4
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Fancy Publications
    Sales Rank: 85
    Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (15)

    5-0 out of 5 stars HI is the best horse magazine.
    Horse Illustrated is the best horse magazine. Each issue has fantastic breed profiles, a poster, western and english tips, Q&A sections, and a whole section on horsey things to buy (for you, your horse, friends, or family members who are horse crazy). I've been subscribing to this magazine for a year and love it. It's a perfect magazine for kids and adults alike.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Horse Illustrated
    Horse Illustrated really is "the magazine for responsible horse owners". It has everything you need, including vet, training, riding (english & western), barn care, and every day horse care. They have useful information with a touch of humor. I always learn something new to try around the barn, wether its organizing your tack room or the "how-to's" of the horse world. I LOVE THIS MAGAZINE!!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A read from Cover to the Last Page
    My niece and I love this magazine. I love it it for the articles, and since she is 8 years old, she lives the posters inside. Whether you ride English, Western or even with an Australian saddle, every horse person will enjoy the magazine. I also get Dog Fancy, and Horse Illustarted is set up the same way: Long informative articles, as well as short newsworthy 2 papragraph stories. I enjoy reading about the different breeds that I do not know much about. Since I ride a quarter horse, it is interesting to learn about other breeds.

    5-0 out of 5 stars GOOD!!!!!!!!
    Absolutely brilliant! This magazine has kept me a loyal subscriber for nearly three years now. Although I am an artist, and half the reason I subscribe is for the glorious photographs (much of which is photograohed by Bob Langrish) I also love the articles. Cindy Hale's "Life With Horses" daily columns are always filled with humor about her horses daily lives, "Vet Files" is very informative about horse health, "Western Roundup" and "English Arena" (both updated) are in-depth with English and Western riding tips of all desciplines, and several more columns and articles I have found enjoyable and helpful. This magazine should go to anyone who owns horses or not! I would recomend Young Rider too. It's very good and I loved it especially the daily contests!

    3-0 out of 5 stars A nice magazine for amateurs or younger horse enthusiasts.
    I began subscribing to Horse Illustrated in elementary school, and it really was a great introduction to the horse world for me. It taught me a lot of the basics. But to be honest, the only reason I continue that subscription today, as a college student, is for the photography (which is absolutely wonderful!). I'm an artist, and find the pictures in this magazine just unbeatable for reference and inspiration.

    For the knowledgable equestrian, however, this magazine isn't really all that useful. The articles give surface-level information and the magazine as a whole is not focused on any specific aspect of the horse world. It's a fairly decent all-arounder for newbies and amateurs.

    I would also caution any reader to take the information given in Horse Illustrated's articles with a grain of salt and always check other sources. I was rather dismayed to see a recent "Breed Profile" on the much-hyped "Gypsy Vanner Horse." This really isn't a breed at all. It's a [very successful] marketing scheme, and the name is actually trademarked. Artists have been faced with legal action for rendering portrayals of "Gypsy Vanners." They're beautiful horses, yes, but putting them forth as a breed is simply a fallacy.

    That's just one of many examples, and this isn't the place to expound on every gripe I've ever had with the magazine. Most of the articles are of decent quality, though they don't go too in-depth, and would be a good foundation of equine knowledge to build upon. If you're looking for something more specialized or academic, however, you won't find what you're looking for here. For English riders I'd highly recommend Practical Horseman instead, and Equus is a pretty good all-around magazine with an emphasis on horse care. ... Read more


    10. Archaeology
    list price: $29.94
    our price: $15.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005N7OL
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Archaeological Institute of America
    Sales Rank: 170
    Average Customer Review: 4.58 out of 5 stars
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    Abstract


    Presents articles written to meet the needs of the general reader interested in archaeology.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (12)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Must Read for Armchair Archaeologists
    Archaeology magazine gives the non-specialist a look into the fascinating world of archaeology. It is written in laymen's terms and on a level that assumes some general knowledge of famous archaeological sites without delving into minutiae that might be boring to some readers. There are excellent articles with a more than adequate amount of detail. The articles are usually copiously illustrated with colour photos. There are also very useful book reviews at the end of every issue. I have bought several books based on the recommendations given by these reviews. I've subscribed for two years and I was so impressed with the magazine that I bought the last ten years of back issues on Eb*y in order to have a reference library of my own.

    5-0 out of 5 stars I can dig it!
    Hmmmm. Well, with a title on my review like that, I'd better make this a good one!

    'Archaeology' magazine is one of those rare magazines where I keep all of the back issues. Glorious photography, informative maps, charts and diagrams, in depth articles which span the entire globe (and the entire history and prehistory of the globe) -- this magazine covers it all. Each issue represents a broad range of research locations, styles, and discoveries. They regularly highlight personalities (one of my favourites being a few years ago, an article on 'Mayan maverick' Ian Graham and his crusade to record and save Mayan ruins). Many issues have special sections which go into great detail about a particular archaeological issue, approaching the issue from the standpoint of different perspectives, methodologies and strategies.

    'Archaeology' has been around for more than fifty years (its first publication was in the spring of 1948 as a quarterly, beginning the tradition even in that issue of covering stories all over the globe, and serving the general public. It is now a bimonthly, and still holds true to its mission. They have regular contests (such as the photography contest) which yield wonderful and occasionally surprising results.

    Among my favourite features is the 'Forum' section, in which you are as likely to get a poem as an essay or factual article. This is the section I always turn to first, as it has short-and-sweet little bits that whet the appetite for the rest of the issue.

    Being an avid book buyer, however, the most invaluable part of the magazine is the book review section, which helps me separate the wheat from the chaff in current publications. I often make purchasing decisions based upon the reviews that this magazine presents, and am always gratified when it reviews a book I've already purchased. Even a poorly-reviewed book, if it is worthy of inclusion here, has to be of note in some way!

    My favourite recent article would have to be the examination of Celtic remains found in bogs throughout Europe, particularly England and Holland. The extent of the Celts throughout Europe is much wider than popularly realised; this article examines small amounts of evidence and ties it together with other known pieces to reconstruct a history of the persons involved in the remains found. Likewise, the articles on Nineveh Marbles a few years ago, which shows not only the scientific but the social and commercial sides of archaeology, is a fascinating tale of how these rare pieces ended up in an English country manor.

    I have had occasion to buy a second copy of the magazine so that I might remove a picture or two for display at my office or on a wall at home -- the photography is so good, and my desire to keep an issue intact, that I find competing impulses.

    Read this and discover something new with every issue. The past is fascinating, and often archaeological discoveries find a way of having an impact on today's world. Be ahead of the game. Subscribe today.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Past Imperfect
    There was a time what Archeology was the best non-academic journal covering the general field of archeology. Unfortunately, this may still be true, but the meaning of best has changed considerable over the years. The Archeology of today has given in to the requirements of the competitive marketplace, and what were once in-depth studies have now become news stories which are as likely to tell you that a particular archeologist is good looking as they are to give you his or her academic credentials.

    It also seems to me that the magazine has more Eurocentric (and Judeo-Christian centric) over the years. Which tends to give some of the articles a bit of a slant when discussing cultures that aren't important to that particular viewpoint. Since my own interest has shifted from Middle-Eastern and North African to Asian this can get irksome. Another thing that frustrates me is a lack of a bibliography at times when one would be very helpful.

    Still, this is a well-made magazine that covers a wide field of subjects. It is probably unfair to insist that they cover everything equally well, especially when they have become more dependent on independent writers. The photography is always good, and the writing and editing are consistent and literate. If you can bring yourself to deal with titles like 'Everyone Loves a Bloodbath' and 'Moche Mug Shots' there still is a lot of good reading on these pages. Just remember to keep a grain of salt handy.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect reading for closet archeologists
    The magazine on a whole is full of educational material, but it was the articles and editorials by Professor Bob Brier that made me buy the magazine at the book store. Now I have the subsciption and the only thing that could make me happier is having the magazine published every month, instead of bi-monthly.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Highly Informative
    I love this magazine. It is highly informative and filled with interesting tidbits. It is a good buy and a great read. It is filled with articles and is not cluttered with advertisements. ... Read more


    11. Bird Talk
    list price: $47.88
    our price: $13.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005N7OW
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Fancy Publications
    Sales Rank: 335
    Average Customer Review: 3.73 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (15)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A must have for parrot owners and bird lovers
    When you have parrots, you can never have too much information. Especially new parrot owners should have at least one year of this magazine. It's full of articles on behavior, medical issues, fun stories, and serious conservation issues. I especially like the behavior articles. They have excellent authors like Mattie Sue Athan, Bobbi Brinker and a host of other well known authors, breeders and bird owners. I have a Macaw, Cockatoo and African Grey - and I have pulled back issues of Bird Talk many a time to find things out like "why is he doing that?" or "should he be doing this?" It especially helped when my parrot was beginning to act aggressive, I found out from Bird Talk that this tends to happen when they are moulting. So make sure you get your info, you won't be sorry.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Good Beginner's Magazine
    Bird Talk is a good magazine for people new to companion birds, including children. It contains solid basic information on diet, housing, and safety for new bird owners. The focus is on parrots, though recent articles have begun to cover some finches and softbills as well. Reading this magazine for a year will be enough to help most people decide if a bird is right for them, and to give people some idea of what species to select. The beautiful photography and extensive advertising for specialty products are also plusses.

    There are three main drawbacks to Bird Talk. First, the information is very basic. Those interested in in-depth information on any species won't find it here - check out books or the AFA Watchbird (the American Federation of Aviculture's magazine) for more serious information. Second, as another reviewer pointed out, the material is often redundant. Subscribe for two years or more, and you'll feel like you're reading back issues instead of a current magazine. Finally, the magazine tends NOT to cover the more difficult aspects of bird ownership in any depth. As any parrot rescue can tell you, parrots (like dogs) can have some serious behavior issues if not properly socialized and cared for, including screaming, feather picking, aggression, and self-mutilation. The magazine glosses over or outright ignores the more difficult side of parrot ownership, which is unfortunate, especially since so many up-and-coming bird owners rely on it for information.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Lots of advertisements! Little information┬┐
    If you are looking for a magazine and have low expectations. A magazine with a few cute photos, with very basic (VERY) information then you may want to read a copy of this as well as a few others produced by this same publisher.

    I cannot stress any more that the information contained within these pages are BASIC! If you know that parrots have hard beaks then I can honestly say that you will probably read this magazine in 5 min flat.

    DO NOT take the blind advice through advertisements on what to feed your bird. Find someone knowledgably in the subject. It will make the difference between your bird living 40% of its life span and 100%.

    1-0 out of 5 stars If you and your bird are both grown-ups, don't bother...
    As another reviewer pointed out, everything is about baby birds. If you acquire a bird as an adult, this magazine will only frustrate you.

    They offer basic information to get the beginner started, assuming they are buying a baby, but a serious bird owner will outgrow this magazine in about a year.

    If you and your bird have made it through adolescence, and you feed pellets/fresh fruits/veggies/fresh water daily, keep a clean environment and don't use non-stick cookware/aerosols/etc. you've probably already outgrown it.

    And Bird Talk is geared toward inexperienced pet bird owners, not breeders. Breeding is far too advanced for the audience that this magazine is directed to, so they touch very lightly on it, offering nothing that a breeder wouldn't already know.

    5-0 out of 5 stars great!
    this magazine informs me on the behaviors and keeping of caged birds it always has intresting and informative articals I highly recommend it to hobbists, breeders and novices alike. ... Read more


    12. National Geographic en Espanol
    list price: $47.40
    our price: $29.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B000066SZW
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Editorial Televisa
    Sales Rank: 410
    Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Reviews (1)

    4-0 out of 5 stars ENTERATE DE FORMA SERIA
    Si,de forma seria que sucede en el resto del mundo!Bellisimas fotografias,buena redaccion.Transporta al lugar o tema del que se trata en el articulo.Es un revista que documenta sobre temas actuales y dice mas que el titulo. ... Read more


    13. Science News
    list price: $156.00
    our price: $42.97
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006AMT6
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Science Service
    Sales Rank: 128
    Average Customer Review: 4.88 out of 5 stars
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    Abstract


    Presents articles of interest to scientists and others involved with the latest developments in science.
    ... Read more

    Reviews (8)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Pithy, pertinent, and inclusive
    This weekly, readable science magazine runs about ten pages per issue and covers the widest range of topics. There are usually two feature articles and then some updates and tidbits. The writing is targeted for a lay audience but it is not dumbed down and, being so short and to the point, it lacks any of the fluff of thicker, glossier magazines.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Amazon Distorts its Prices
    This is, as you may have gathered from the title of this 'review' a commentary on Amazon and not the magazine (which I highly recommend).

    Amazon claims to be saving you $113 over the normal subscription price when actually they are saving you $11.53. To be sure a savings, but hardly the 72% they claim. One need only visist the Science News website to confirm this.

    4-0 out of 5 stars The best science magazine for the lay person in the US
    I'm not sure how long Science News has been in print, but I remember it from my childhood and that was over 40 years ago. And desprite all the competition from glossy rags like "Discover" and the newly-denatured "Scientific American", Science News survives pretty much unchanged form its earliest days.

    The formula is simple: Brief summaries of contemporary science stories that are written for lay readers who are interested in science, and not in personalities or politics. Science News doesn't insult the reader by dumbing things down- and at the same time it doesn't bury stories in jargon or indeciperable formulas.

    Well written, concise, and equally readable by the intelligent child or the curious adult.

    5-0 out of 5 stars To stay informed about new developments in science
    Science News, published by a non-profit organization, Science Service, for 80 years, is a weekly 16-page magazine reporting the most important recent research in all fields of science, all for less than a dollar per issue. It is jam-packed with brief and accurate articles primarily aimed at general readers; scientists also use it to keep up with developments in fields other than their own. For those wishing to read more about the content of a specific article, the reader is generally told where to look in the scientific literature. The writing is very clear - several of its reporters have received national and international awards for science writing.

    It also has a very well-organized online version - partial contents for non-subscribers, complete contents for subscribers; it has some features not found in the print version.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The best magazine that I read
    This is the best science magazine out there. The name says it all. It comes every week, is short enought that I can read it one sitting, and containts succinct articles on a broad range of topics that help me keep up on science news. Instead of massive rambling 10 page aritcles about completely random subjects like some other mags, (hint: Scientific American) it just delivers exactly what I want. This subscription alone will handle your science news fix. ... Read more


    14. Aviation Week & Space Technology
    list price: $306.00
    our price: $64.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B000065ALE
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies
    Sales Rank: 507
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Abstract


    Articles on the aviation and aerospace industries, including military and civilian aircraft, weapons, rockets, and space exploration. www.aviationnow.com
    ... Read more

    Reviews (4)

    5-0 out of 5 stars The World Of Aerospace At Your Fingertips
    'Aviation Week & Space Technology' is the touchstone for quality technical periodicals the world over. The breadth and depth of knowledge in the 'Aviation Week & Space Technology' editorial staff and reporters is unparalleled and results in the most up to date and expert articles on aerospace in the world.

    Although written mostly for industry professionals, individual articles can be grasped readily by fairly well versed laymen. The scope of the publication is a bit daunting, though, with complete coverage of military and civilian aviation, to include pilot reports, weapons assessments, and governmental and budgetary issues of relevance, as well as space launches and satellites and the allied technologies intrinsic to those disciplines. The coverage of significant aerospace events, such as an airline accident, the loss of 'Columbia', or the events of September 11, 2001 is much better detailed than in the mainstream media, for a couple of reasons: first, 'Aviation Week & Space Technology' does not sensationalize the news, they only care about factual accountings of events; second, the reporting staff is much more technically knowledgeable than anyone in the mass media or on the television networks; and, third, the expectation of readers is so high that reporters are very cognizant that misreporting, incorrect statements, or over-simplification will result in a deluge of e-mail from annoyed technical professionals.

    If you are interested in the world of aerospace, particularly if you are a professional in the field, get this magazine: it will put you far ahead of the pack in general industry knowledge. I highly recommend 'Aviation Week & Space Technology' for all your aerospace news.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Aviation Week & Space Technology
    I am a 49 year old male that started subscribing to Aviation Week and Space Technology in 1980. This magazine allows me to stay in step with current events as they pertain to commercial & military aviation as well as space technology. Easy reading while sitting in your night chair or laying in bed. Additionally, this magazine gives you a heads up on companies involved in these fields and will assist you in any investment decisions you may make concerning these companies. Keeps you ahead of the pack....which can make you money or save you money.
    I recommend Aviation Week & Space Technology to anyone interested in air and/or space and the companies that make it happen.

    5-0 out of 5 stars For those that want to be in the know with Aviation & Space!
    I am a 49 year old male that started subscribing to Aviation Week and Space Technology in 1980. This magazine allows me to stay in step with current events as they pertain to commercial & military aviation as well as space technology. Easy reading while sitting in your night chair or laying in bed. Additionally, this magazine gives you a heads up on companies involved in these fields and will assist you in any investment decisions you may make concerning these companies. Keeps you ahead of the pack....which can make you money or save you money.
    I recommend Aviation Week & Space Technology to anyone interested in air and/or space and the companies that make it happen.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Aviation Week
    I have read this magazine for many years (20 or so) and find it extremely educational regarding anything pertaining to the aviation/space program. This includes, but is not limited to, aircraft, missiles, FAA, national defense, security, and aerospace program and NASA activities. The articles are readily understood by anyone having a technical degree or appropriate experience in a related field; and the photographic presentations are absolutely "outstanding."

    rkd... ... Read more


    15. Diabetes Forecast
    list price: $48.00
    our price: $21.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005QJDW
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: American Diabetes Association
    Sales Rank: 404
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    Abstract


    Presents articles that discuss all aspects of diabetes.Offers insight on new strategies to prevent and cure diabetes as well as improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.
    ... Read more


    16. Wildbird
    list price: $23.94
    our price: $12.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005N7TJ
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Fancy Publications
    Sales Rank: 402
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    17. Archaeology Odyssey
    list price: $27.00
    our price: $13.97
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B000060MJP
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Biblical Archaeology Society
    Sales Rank: 388
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars

    You Should Dig This


    I've subscribed to this since I first read it. The first issue I saw was number two I think. Like many other issues since, that one was devoted for the most part to a single topic -- in that case the Etruscans -- and was rivetting. I hardly noticed I was on the beach sucking up UV and ice water. This is easily my favorite magazine, and certainly is my all-time favorite magazine about archaeology and history. It blew _Discovering Archaeology_ off the map, despite better distribution for its competitor.

    A focus on Bible related archaeology seems to be a problem for some narrow-minded folks when they see BAR. _Archaeology Odyssey_ is published by BAR, but isn't "Biblical". ... ... Read more


    18. Bird Watchers Digest
    list price: $23.94
    our price: $19.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005Q7E7
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Pardson Inc
    Sales Rank: 759
    Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (1)

    4-0 out of 5 stars From the novice to the advanced lister; should appeal to all
    This is one of the few magazines I read from cover-to-cover. Bird Watcher's Digest has something for everyone. They offer advice on how to improve feeder systems for individuals who enjoy backyard birdwatching. They provide informative identification tips for those trickier species for people who have just begun their journey into the feathered realm. Additionally, they have great authors & astounding birders, like Kenn Kauffman (who's both), who regularly write short articles for them. These should appeal to everyone at whatever experience level. The size of the magazine makes it easy to tote into the field so you can pull it out & read while waiting for that elusive rarity to show up for you to get a quick glimpse of before it dashes off to parts unknown again. I highly recommend this magazine. Besides, you can't be in the field all of the time & this makes the perfect thing to read on those cold, wet, rainy days when even the birds are smart enough to stay in-doors. ... Read more


    19. Birders World

    our price: $17.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00008GSZU
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Kalmbach Publ Co
    Sales Rank: 377
    Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (1)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Magazine!!!
    I have been subscribing to BW for almost 3 yrs now and have loved every issue. They always strive to keep up with the seasons, i.e. migrations, plumages and nesting... I keep every issue I receive because they are really good reference materials.

    I completely suggest this magazine to anyone who is a birdwatcher or just loves birds in general!!! ... Read more


    20. Birds & Blooms

    our price: $17.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006K5VA
    Catlog: Magazine
    Publisher: Reiman Publications
    Sales Rank: 192
    Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (3)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Pretty pictures but lightweight information
    You'll love the bright glossy photos of N. American garden birds and plants (I do) but don't expect to find in-depth birding or gardening information in Birds and Blooms. Like all of the magazines from Reiman Publications, it targets the down-home and down-to-earth crowd and lacks conspicuous advertising (except for other Reiman products or tours, and the goods in its "country store"). For those who wish to indulge their interest in their gardens' creatures, but not get very in-depth, it is a relaxing magazine as it doesn't require a higher reading level or familiarity with species' scientific names. But if you want advanced information or advice on gardening or birding, you should look to other periodicals. I find this to be a great gift for loved ones who, because of age or physical condition, are not able to be as active in the garden as they once were. The colorful photos (many are stock, some are sent in by readers) make it an enjoyable magazine for all ages.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Fun for the Backyard Birder or Gardener!
    Birds and Blooms is a bi-monthly magazine (6 issues per year) for backyard birders and gardeners. It has a standard 8x10 1/2 inch format. Each issue has about 65 pages. For birders, there are articles on species of birds that you might find in your back yard, what to feed birds, how to house them, simple projects you can make for the birds in your yard, a question and answer column, and lots of pictures. For gardeners, there are articles on what plants to get, how to care for them, gardening projects, and ideas for landscaping. (Birds and Blooms addresses decorative gardening, not vegetable gardening.) And there are lots of big colorful pictures of both plants and birds. I am more of a bird-lover than a gardener myself. I especially like the "Bird Tales" feature in which readers recount funny and fascinating behavior that they have observed in their avian neighbors. That alone would be worth the price of the subscription to me. If you are into birdhouses or elaborate bird feeders, Birds and Blooms seems to always have some articles showcasing unusual birdhouses and feeders, as well as an annual competition for both. For those who like puzzles, there is a word find in every issue, as well as a find-the-hidden-acorn for which you can win prizes. There is no advertising in Birds and Blooms.

    Fun and facts for those who like to watch or feed birds in their own yard (or apartment balcony) and for people who enjoy flower gardening!

    4-0 out of 5 stars great pictures
    I love this magazine for it's beautiful pictures. It has wonderful tips for attracting birds to your yard, what to feed them, how to repel the pest species, etc. The gardening pictures and information are fantastic too. There is a lot of input showcasing prizewinning flowers,backyard bird sightings, bird house building and other outdoor projects from the subscribers. I decided to have it delivered so my 4yr old and I could enjoy the pictures over and over. ... Read more


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